What is the value of a silver certificate dollar bill

5 Aug 2003 I have a one dollar bill 1935 F,silver certificate,good condition worth.Also 1957 B, silver certificate,good condition. Thank you Ricky 

These are the first small-size silver certificates, and as such they can be worth up to about $12. Different series can be worth more, however, including the 1928E, which can fetch up to $150. The silver certificate dollar bill value is determined with the help of concepts and methods of numismatics and its principles. The dollar bill value is determined on basic factors such as the printing series to which it belonged, the mint or the press to which it belonged, the physical damage or the physical state of the bill. Silver certificates are typically worth a small premium over face value, with circulated certificates typically selling for $1.25 to $1.50 each. Meanwhile, uncirculated silver certificates can be worth between $2 and $4 apiece. * Earlier issue How much is a silver certificate dollar bill worth with blue seal 1957. There is no additional value given for that specific serial numbers on this dollar. The values apply to 1957A and 1957B. Circulated condition- $1.50 . Perfect condition- $3. 1957 $1 was the last silver certificate dollar issued in by the US. Circulated condition- $1.50. Credit: Denver Post/Denver Post/Getty Images As of 2014, one dollar silver certificates from 1957 are worth between $1.25 and $4. Uncirculated dollar certificates bring in more money than circulated ones, but it is still a very small amount over face value. Silver certificates that have issue dates between 1935 and 1957 look nearly identical to the current U.S. dollar bill that features George Washington. Because this time frame represents the most commonly issued silver certificates, most 1957 silver certificates in circulation are worth only slightly more than face value, typically $1.25 to $1.50 . Silver certificates from 1957 and 1935 are common, however they will still sell for 1.5-2x face value on Ebay. In the video we discuss the difference between silver certificates and federal reserve

Silver certificates from 1957 and 1935 are common, however they will still sell for 1.5-2x face value on Ebay. In the video we discuss the difference between silver certificates and federal reserve

Most 1935 to 1957 series Silver Certificates are worth a small premium over face value. Circulated examples can sell for $1.25 to $1.50 each, while uncirculated $1 Silver Certificates are worth $2 to $4 each. Exceptions include Star notes and other varieties and blocks including 1935A Hawaii and North Africa notes, and experimental notes. In 1967, Congress passed legislation that allowed for silver certificate holders to redeem the bills for silver only until June 24, 1968. If you surrender your silver certificate to a bank teller today, she’ll pay you only the face value, $1, for it. While the value of silver has increased since the bills were issued, their face value remains $1. Most of the 1928 one dollar silver certificates will sell for around $30 in very fine condition and around $70 in uncirculated condition with a grade of MS 63. The series plays a large role in its value. A key difference is that below Washington on a silver certificate dollar it says that it is, "one dollar in silver payable to the bearer on demand.". These silver certificates are typically worth a small premium over face value, with circulated certificates typically selling for $1.25 to $1.50 each. These are the first small-size silver certificates, and as such they can be worth up to about $12. Different series can be worth more, however, including the 1928E, which can fetch up to $150. Silver certificates are typically worth a small premium over face value, with circulated certificates typically selling for $1.25 to $1.50 each. Meanwhile, uncirculated silver certificates can be worth between $2 and $4 apiece. Large-size silver certificates (1878 to 1923) were issued initially in denominations from $10 to $1,000 (in 1878 and 1880) and in 1886 the $1, $2, and $5 were authorized. In 1928, all United States bank notes were re-designed and the size reduced.

Silver certificates that have issue dates between 1935 and 1957 look nearly identical to the current U.S. dollar bill that features George Washington. Because this time frame represents the most commonly issued silver certificates, most 1957 silver certificates in circulation are worth only slightly more than face value, typically $1.25 to $1.50 .

Silver certificates are typically worth a small premium over face value, with circulated certificates typically selling for $1.25 to $1.50 each. Meanwhile, uncirculated silver certificates can be worth between $2 and $4 apiece. * Earlier issue How much is a silver certificate dollar bill worth with blue seal 1957. There is no additional value given for that specific serial numbers on this dollar. The values apply to 1957A and 1957B. Circulated condition- $1.50 . Perfect condition- $3. 1957 $1 was the last silver certificate dollar issued in by the US. Circulated condition- $1.50. Credit: Denver Post/Denver Post/Getty Images As of 2014, one dollar silver certificates from 1957 are worth between $1.25 and $4. Uncirculated dollar certificates bring in more money than circulated ones, but it is still a very small amount over face value. Silver certificates that have issue dates between 1935 and 1957 look nearly identical to the current U.S. dollar bill that features George Washington. Because this time frame represents the most commonly issued silver certificates, most 1957 silver certificates in circulation are worth only slightly more than face value, typically $1.25 to $1.50 .

24 Oct 2016 1929-1-dollar-silver-certificate-ha-lead The intrinsic value of a silver dollar was still less than $1 (as they do not contain an Many new collectors were born, but the increase in note supply overcame the growing demand.

A key difference is that below Washington on a silver certificate dollar it says that it is, "one dollar in silver payable to the bearer on demand.". These silver certificates are typically worth a small premium over face value, with circulated certificates typically selling for $1.25 to $1.50 each. These are the first small-size silver certificates, and as such they can be worth up to about $12. Different series can be worth more, however, including the 1928E, which can fetch up to $150. Silver certificates are typically worth a small premium over face value, with circulated certificates typically selling for $1.25 to $1.50 each. Meanwhile, uncirculated silver certificates can be worth between $2 and $4 apiece. Large-size silver certificates (1878 to 1923) were issued initially in denominations from $10 to $1,000 (in 1878 and 1880) and in 1886 the $1, $2, and $5 were authorized. In 1928, all United States bank notes were re-designed and the size reduced. The series of 1934 $1 silver certificate is common. Most examples are worth less than $12. These are unique looking because they are the only year to have a blue “1” printed on the left hand side of the bill. Regardless of a bill's age or rarity, a bank is only allowed to give you face value so you would only get $1 for a 1935 silver certificate. That said, most average-condition 1935 $1 bills aren't These are the first small-size silver certificates, and as such they can be worth up to about $12. Different series can be worth more, however, including the 1928E, which can fetch up to $150.

The value of each silver certificate is based on numerous variables. One of the largest determinants of the value of the bill is the grading of the certificate.

Most of the 1928 one dollar silver certificates will sell for around $30 in very fine condition and around $70 in uncirculated condition with a grade of MS 63. The series plays a large role in its value. A key difference is that below Washington on a silver certificate dollar it says that it is, "one dollar in silver payable to the bearer on demand.". These silver certificates are typically worth a small premium over face value, with circulated certificates typically selling for $1.25 to $1.50 each. These are the first small-size silver certificates, and as such they can be worth up to about $12. Different series can be worth more, however, including the 1928E, which can fetch up to $150. Silver certificates are typically worth a small premium over face value, with circulated certificates typically selling for $1.25 to $1.50 each. Meanwhile, uncirculated silver certificates can be worth between $2 and $4 apiece. Large-size silver certificates (1878 to 1923) were issued initially in denominations from $10 to $1,000 (in 1878 and 1880) and in 1886 the $1, $2, and $5 were authorized. In 1928, all United States bank notes were re-designed and the size reduced. The series of 1934 $1 silver certificate is common. Most examples are worth less than $12. These are unique looking because they are the only year to have a blue “1” printed on the left hand side of the bill.

NOTE: Due to extreme order volumes, please expect a shipping delay of up to 3 business days. Silver Certificates (Large Size). 44 of 44 results. Sort &  24 Oct 2016 1929-1-dollar-silver-certificate-ha-lead The intrinsic value of a silver dollar was still less than $1 (as they do not contain an Many new collectors were born, but the increase in note supply overcame the growing demand. 5 Aug 2003 I have a one dollar bill 1935 F,silver certificate,good condition worth.Also 1957 B, silver certificate,good condition. Thank you Ricky